Fighting Self-conscious Thoughts

We all feel self-conscious at some point in our lives. Confidence is built up over time, and comes more easier for some that others. We just need to know how to fight those negative thoughts that hold us back.

But where do these thoughts come from? How to we stop these thoughts from taking over?

We asked Australian Child Psychologist, Jacki Short, to help us answer these questions.

She says age isn’t necessarily a factor in measuring self-consciousness because anyone can feel this way. It’s more so personality traits and social environments that influence this.

“There are some personality characteristics that can make all of us more self-conscious at times in our lives than others. So I think at the ages at which we start to be more socially interactive, for instance when we go to school or start a new job, when we move into a new role in life we become more self-conscious about who we are and how we might be presenting to others. It might raise a little bit of anxiety about how others see us and about why we want to be portrayed in a particular way.”

The first step in creating positive thoughts is helping our friends acknowledge that they are not the only ones that feel this way. “[When someone is feeling this way] try and work out other ways to negate that to let them know that everybody is really, really anxious at some time in their life at what other people might think about them.”

She talks about a concept called ‘audience’, which is feeling like there is an audience watching you wherever you are. “So if that’s, for instance, a source of bad self-esteem we need to challenge that thinking and we need to do some little experiments in real-life”.

Stepping out in a cheeky bikini could be one of those experiments.

There are so many people in the public eye who believe thinking positively is the key. In March, the #bodypositive and #loveyournbody hashtags was trending worldwide on Twitter. It was started by American vlogger, Lindsay Demeola, in an effort to stop girls from looking at themselves in a negative way.

And, as you can see below, it worked like a charm.

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